Search for:
Welcome Guest
[Login | Register]
Shopping Basket
Your basket is empty.
0Items in cart:
$0.00Total:
 
Information
Products: 861
Categories: 78
Prices: US Dollars
 
Currency
 
Language
 
Location: /Squadron Patches/USN NAVY Squadrons

WWII Patch, USN, ZP-41 Blimpron VP-41 Caribbean

WWII Patch, USN, ZP-41 Blimpron VP-41 Caribbean

Product Information
WWII US Navy Squadron Patch
USN ZP-41  Blimpron VP-41
Navy Blimp Patrol Squadron 41
Blimpron Forty One
Sao Luiz, Brazil
NAS Santa Ana (Tustin), CA Naval Air Station
1 Oct 1942 - 15 Nov 1946
Walt Disney Design
5 1/8 inches


Even people who lived through those early war years have forgotten the toll taken by enemy submarines.  The merchant ships sunk numbered in the thousands with 454 sunk by German U-boats in 1942 in our Atlantic coastal area.  Many of these sinkings were within sight of land, sometimes during daylight hours while swimmers on the beach watched in disbelief.  By 1943 the number of sinkings was reduced to 65, eight in 1944 and only three in 1945. The reduction was in direct ratio to the development of LTA operations.  No ship escorted by a blimp was ever sunk.  We hasten to add that this antisubmarine program was a partnership operation that developed using blimps the small CVE "jeep carriers," PBY Catalina squadrons and other patrol squadrons.  The aircraft however, could not be watching over these merchant fleets all the time, as the blimps could.  The blimps often could do the job themselves with their limited fire power and depth charges.  When needed they could call for aircraft from the CVE assigned the area.  The system worked very well.


Rescue was another area in which blimps distinguished themselves.  Captain  F.B. Baldwin, USMC-R, an ace with five Japanese aircraft to his credit, was one of the first people to be picked up and lifted directly into an airship car.  He had crashed off the coast of California on a training flight.  Many a survivor of sunken ships gratefully remembered the rations and medical supplies lowered to them from K-ships which then called for surface craft to pick them up.  Since the airships had a galley this often meant hot food, which was welcome in the North Atlantic.

World War II Fleet Airship Wings and Squadrons

Wing

Squadron

NAS Main Base

# Airships

One

ZP-11

South Weymouth, MA

8

"

ZP-12

Lakehurst, NJ

8

"

ZP-24

Weeksville, NC

8

"

ZP-15

Glynco, GA

8

Two

ZP-21

Richmond, FL

15

"

ZP-22

Houma, LA

4

"

ZP-23

Vernam Field, Jamaica, BWI

4

Three

ZP-31

Santa Ana, CA

12

"

ZP-32

Moffett Field, CA

12

"

ZP-33

Tillamook, OR

8

Four

ZP-41

Sao Luiz, Brazil

8

"

ZP-42

Macelo, Brazil

8

Five

ZP-51

Trinidad, BWI

8

 

SQD-14

Port Lyautey, French Morocco

6

 

Util SQD-1

Headquarters, Key West, FL

8

In the years 1942–44, approximately 1,400 airship pilots and 3,000 support crew members were trained in the military airship crew training program and the airship military personnel grew from 430 to 12,400. The US airships were produced by the Goodyear factory in Akron, Ohio. From 1942 till 1945, 154 airships were built for the US Navy (133 K-class, 10 L-class, seven G-class, four M-class) and five L-class for civilian customers (serial numbers L-4 to L-8).

The primary airship tasks were patrol and convoy escort near the US coastline. They also served as an organisation center for the convoys to direct ship movements, and were used in naval search and rescue operations. Rarer duties of the airships included aerophoto reconnaissance, naval mine-laying and mine-sweeping, parachute unit transport and deployment, cargo and personnel transportation. They were deemed quite successful in their duties with the highest combat readiness factor in the entire US air force (87%).

In 1944-45, the United States Navy moved an entire squadron of eight Goodyear K class blimps (K-123, K-130, K-109, K-134, K-101, K-112, K-89, & K-114) with flight and maintenance crews from Weeksville Naval Air Station in North Carolina to Port Lyautey, French Morocco. Their mission was to locate and destroy German U-boats in the relatively shallow waters around the Strait of Gibraltar where magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) was viable. PBY aircraft had been searching these waters but MAD required low altitude flying that was dangerous at night for these aircraft. The blimps were considered a perfect solution to establish a 24/7 MAD barrier (fence) at the Straits of Gibraltar with the PBYs flying the day shift and the blimps flying the night shift. The first two blimps (K-123 & K-130) left South Weymouth NAS on 28 May 1944 and flew to Argentia, Newfoundland, the Azores, and finally to Port Lyautey where they completed the first transatlantic crossing by non-rigid airships on 1 June 1944. The blimps of USN Blimp Squadron ZP-14 (Blimpron 14, aka The Africa Squadron) also conducted mine-spotting and minesweeping operations in key Mediterranean ports and various escorts including the convoy carrying United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to the Yalta Conference in 1945.

During the war some 532 ships without airship escort were sunk near the US coast by enemy submarines. Only one ship, the tanker Persephone, of the 89,000 or so in convoys escorted by blimps was sunk by the enemy. Airships engaged submarines with depth charges and, less frequently, with other on-board weapons. They were excellent at driving submarines down, where their limited speed and range prevented them from attacking convoys. The weapons available to airships were so limited that until the advent of the homing torpedo they had little chance of sinking a submarine.

Only one airship was ever destroyed by U-boat: on the night of 18/19 July 1943, a K-class airship (K-74) from ZP-21 division was patrolling the coastline near Florida. Using radar, the airship located a surfaced German submarine. The K-74 made her attack run but the U-boat opened fire first. K-74's depth charges did not release as she crossed the U-boat and the K-74 received serious damage, losing gas pressure and an engine but landing in the water without loss of life. The crew was rescued by patrol boats in the morning, but one crewman, Aviation Machinist's Mate Second Class Isadore Stessel, died from a shark attack. The U-Boat, submarine U-134, was slightly damaged and the next day or so was attacked by aircraft sustaining damage that forced it to return to base. It was finally sunk on 24 August 1943 by a British Vickers Wellington near Vigo, Spain

Fleet Airship Wing One operated from Lakehurst, NJ, Glynco, GA, Weeksville, NC, South Weymouth NAS Massachusetts, Brunswick NAS and Bar Harbor ME, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, and Argentia, Newfoundland.
Some US airships saw action in the European war theatre. The ZP-14 unit operating in the Mediterranean area from June 1944 completely denied the use of the Gibraltar Straits to Axis submarines. Airships from the ZP-12 unit took part in the sinking of the last U-Boat before German capitulation, sinking U-881 on 6 May 1945 together with destroyers Atherton and Mobery.

Other airships patrolled the Caribbean, Fleet Airship Wing Two, Headquartered at NAS Richmond, Florida, covered the Gulf of Mexico from Richmond and Key West, FL, Houma, Louisiana, as well as Hitchcock and Brownsville, Texas. FAW 2 also patrolled the northern Caribbean from San Julian,[clarification needed] the Isle of Pines (now called Isla de la Juventud) and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba as well as Vernam Field, Jamaica.

Navy blimps of Fleet Airship Wing Five, (ZP-51) operated from bases in Trinidad, British Guiana and Parmaribo, Dutch Guiana. Fleet Airship Wing Four operated along the coast of Brazil. Two squadrons, VP-41 and VP-42 flew from bases at Amapá, Igarape Assu, Sao Luiz, Fortaleza, Fernando de Noronha, Recife, Maceió, Ipitanga (near Salvador, Bahia), Caravellas, Vitoria and the hangar built for the Graf Zeppelin at Santa Cruz, Rio de Janeiro.

Fleet Airship Wing Three operated squadrons, ZP-32 from Moffett Field, ZP-31 at NAS Santa Ana, and ZP-33 at NAS Tillamook, Oregon. Auxiliary fields were at Del Mar, Lompoc, Watsonville and Eureka, CA, North Bend and Astoria, Oregon, as well as Shelton and Quillayute in Washington.

From 2 January 1942 till the end of war airship operations in the Atlantic, the airships of the Atlantic fleet made 37,554 flights and flew 378,237 hours. Of the over 70,000 ships in convoys protected by blimps, only one was sunk by a submarine while under blimp escort.

The Soviet Union used a single airship during the war. The W-12, built in 1939, entered service in 1942 for paratrooper training and equipment transport. It made 1432 runs with 300 metric tons of cargo until 1945. On 1 February 1945, the Soviets constructed a second airship, a Pobeda-class (Victory-class) unit (used for mine-sweeping and wreckage clearing in the Black Sea) which crashed on 21 January 1947. Another W-class - W-12bis Patriot - was commissioned in 1947 and was mostly used for crew training, parades and propaganda.

Price: $210.00 $175.00


Product Code: PatchUSN.041.ZP41Blimpron41.Caribbean
SOLD OUT. OUT OF STOCK
Featured Product
 
Popular Products
 
Sale Items
 
Mailing List
Subscribe to our mailing list below:
Email:
 
 
Store Sitemap or Flow Chart of Popular Store Categories, Sections, and Sub-Groups in a Tree Format.
Store Site Map

This button will take you to the Store NAVIGATION HELP and TUTORIALS Page, and tell you about the hidden search shortcuts and how to purchase the items For Sale here.
Store Navigation / Help
This button will perform a custom Google search of my website. Send me an email

Back to: Brian's Military Jeeps of WWII

Back to: Squadron Patches of WWII

Back to: Great*Find Antiques

Back to: Estate Art Glass

Back to: Victorian Lightning Rods

B and B Book Sales. Our books for sale on Amazon.com

You may like to visit my other sites above
- they will open in a new window -

 
Store Switch Board
A Fast Loading, No Frills List of Everything WWII I have up on Auction.  My WWII Items
 For Sale by Auction
A Fast Loading, No Frills List of Antiques, Art Glass, etc  I have up on Auction.  My Antiques
 For Sale by Auction
My Shipping, Return, and Auction Policies  Shipping, Return &
 Auction Policies
Legal Notices, Credits, and Thanks: copyrights, Q and A regarding permission to copy content, photographs, and text, Thank you's, and groups that I belong to.  Legal Notices
Convert your to Currency to US$  Currency Converter
Translate my webpages into other languages.  Language Translator
Have some extra items you want to sell? Post them for free on my Free Classified Ads Bulletin Boards.  Sell Your Extras - 
 Free Classified Ads
My Want Lists:  Lists of item I want for my personal collections. Please have a look and see if you can help me out with any of them.  My Want Lists
Click Here to get on My Mailing Lists and Why you should.  Join My Mailing Lists,
 How and Why
   SIGNAL CORPS              6475-PHILA-44-01 

Powered by CubeCart
Copyright Devellion Limited 2006. All rights reserved.