Search for:
Welcome Guest
[Login | Register]
Shopping Basket
Your basket is empty.
0Items in cart:
$0.00Total:
 
Information
Products: 861
Categories: 78
Prices: US Dollars
 
Currency
 
Language
 
Location: /Squadron Patches/Army Air Force Squadrons/AAF units #'d 1-299

WWII Patch, AAF, 61-FS 56-FG 8AF Gabby Gabreski

WWII Patch, AAF, 61-FS 56-FG 8AF  Gabby Gabreski

Product Information
WWII US Army Air Force Squadron Patch
USAAF 61FS, 56FG, 8AF
61st Fighter squadron,
56th Fighter Group, 8th AF
Walt Disney Design - Bulldog
5 3/8 inches


History
The 61st Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) was constituted on November 20, 1940 and activated on January 15, 1941, in Savannah, Georgia, training in P-39 Airacobra and P-40 Warhawk aircraft. The 61st later moved to Charlotte, North Carolina, in May 1941 and again to Charleston, South Carolina, in December 1941, to help defend the East Coast. In November 1942, P-47 Thunderbolt dive test pilots achieved 725 mph, faster than the speed of sound. In 1944, it was recognized as the first fighter squadron in the European theater to score over 100 victories. From 1943 to 1945, the 61st produced 19 Aces, the highest of any squadron in Europe, destroying 248 aircraft in the air and 67.5 aircraft on the ground. The squadron was deactivated October 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey and reactivated at Selfridge Field, Michigan training in P-47's while transitioning to P-51 Mustangs. 
Nickname: Top Dogs
56th Fighter Group (1941–1945)
Lineage
    * 61st Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) (1940–1942)
    * 61st Pursuit Squadron (Interceptor) (Twin Engine) (1942)
    * 61st Fighter Squadron (Twin Engine) (1942)
    * 61st Fighter Squadron (1942–1944)
    * 61st Fighter Squadron, Single Engine (1944–1947)
Bases stationed
    * Savannah, Georgia (1941)
    * Charlotte Army Air Base, North Carolina (1941)
          o Deployed: Myrtle Beach, South Carolina (October–November 1941)
    * Charleston, South Carolina (1941–1942)
    * Bridgeport, Connecticut (1942–1943)
    * RAF Kings Cliffe, England (1943)
    * RAF Horsham St Faith, England (1943)
    * RAF Halesworth, England (1943–1944)
    * RAF Boxted, England (1944–1945)
    * RAF Little Walden, England (1945)
    * Camp Kilmer, New Jersey (1945)
Aircraft Operated
    * P-35 (1941)
    * P-36 Hawk (1941)
    * P-39 Airacobra (1941–1942)
    * P-40 Warhawk (1941–1942)
    * P-47 Thunderbolt (1942–1945, 1946–1947)
    * P-51 Mustang (1946–1947)


Republic Aviation P-47 Thunderbolt, also nicknamed the Jug, went on to become one of the most produced fighter aircraft of all time with 15,683 being manufactured. The P-47 was the largest and heaviest single seat fighter of WW II. The P-47 immediately demonstrated its excellent combat qualities, including speed, rate of climb, maneuverability, heavy fire power, and the ability to take a lot of punishment. With a wingspan of more than 40 feet and a weight of 19,400 pounds, this large aircraft was designed around the powerful 2000 HP Pratt and Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp radial engine. The first P-47 prototype flew in May of 1941, and the primary variant the P-47D went into service in 1943 with units of the U.S. Armys Eighth Air Force. The Jug had a maximum speed in excess of 400 MPH, a service ceiling in excess of 42,000 feet, and was heavily armed with either six or eight heavy caliber machine guns. With its ability to carry up to a 2,500 pound bomb load, the Jug saw lots of use in ground attack roles. Until the introduction of the N model, the P-47 lacked the long range required for fighter escort missions which were most often relegated to P-51 Mustangs or P-38 Lightnings. In his outstanding painting entitled Bridge Busting Jugs, noted aviation artist Stan Stokes depicts Eighth Air Force Jugs in a ground attack mission in the Alps in June of 1944. The top P-47 ace was Francis Gabreski who had flown with the 56th Fighter Group, the first unit to be equipped with the P-47. In August of 1943 Gabreski attained his first aerial combat victory (over an Fw-190) and by years end he had reached ace status with 8 confirmed victories. As Commander of the 61st Squadron, Gabreski continued to chalk up victory after victory, and on seven different occasions he achieved two victories during the same mission. However, in July of 1944 Gabreski damaged the prop on his Jug during a low level attack on an airfield near Coblenz. Forced to make a crash landing, he was captured and remained a prisoner of war until Wars end in 1945.

Top Aces - Name - Victories
Francis S Gabreski -   28.00   
Robert S Johnson -    27.00   
Robert J Rankin -  10.00


Francis S "Gabby" Gabreski was the top scoring 8th Air Force fighter Ace in Europe with 28.5 victories in World War II, plus further 6.5 in Korea. Flying P47s with the 56th Fighter Group, his illustrious career in Europe came to a spectacular end, when, strafing an airfield his aircraft touched the ground. He crash landed and was taken prisoner. The story of this American hero from Oil City, Pennsylvania begins in 1942. Gabreski dropped out of his pre-med studies at the University of Notre Dame to become a flyer. Anxious to get into action quickly Francis Gabreski got himself assigned to the 3-1-5 Polish fighter squadron of the RAF in 1942. Although Gabreski flew many combat missions with the Polish fighter squadron he attained no victories. In February of 1943 he was reassigned to the U.S. Army's Eighth Air Force. On August 24, 1943 he got his first victory (a Focke-Wulf 190) over France. Flying the P-47 Thunderbolt or "Jug", Gabreski continued to achieve victory after victory. He was officially credited with 28 confirmed aerial victories, and that excludes the scores of aircraft, tanks, and other vehicles destroyed by Gabreski during ground attack missions. For many weeks leading up to and following D-Day in June of 1944 Gabby had been on numerous missions involving the dive bombing and strafing of German trains, bridges, armored convoys, and gun emplacements. On July 20,1944 Gabby was scheduled to depart for a much-deserved leave, during which he planned to marry his girl, Kay Lochran. Shortly before his scheduled departure Gabreski was given the opportunity of leading the 61st Squadron of the 56th Fighter Group on an important mission. This was a challenge this ace could not resist. Near Cologne, Gabby spotted an airdrome and began a high-speed low-level attack. Defying his own axiom to "hit them hard, hit them fast, hit them low, but never come around for a second pass," Gabby made an ill-fated second pass over the field. On this second pass his propeller hit the tarmac, and Gabreski was forced to make a crash landing in a wheat field adjacent to the German airfield. For five days he was able to elude the German army, but he was finally captured and sent to Stalag Luft 1 in Barth Germany. In 1945 with the end of the War Gabby was released and he married Kay Cochran on June 11. Not long after the Korean War broke out, Gabby found himself in command of the 51st Fighter Wing, where he flew the F-86 Sabre jet. In Korea Gabreski attained 6.5 more confirmed aerial victories in engagements with Migs, earning the unique distinction of ace status in two different wars. Following his retirement from military service in 1967, Gabby worked for several years for Grumman Aircraft on Long Island. Later he was to become the President and General Manager of the Long Island Railroad. Two of his nine children are Air Force Academy graduates and pilots with the U.S. Air Force. At the time of his retirement from military service in 1967 Gabby is believed to have flown more combat missions than any other American fighter pilot.

Robert Johnson
arrived in England in 1943 and was quickly in the thick of the action, scoring his first aerial victory within a month of his initial combat flying. A year later, having flown 91 combat missions, he had taken his total of aerial victories to 27.

Price: $185.00


Product Code: PatchAAF.0061.61FS.56FG.8AF
SOLD OUT. OUT OF STOCK
Featured Product
 
Popular Products
 
Sale Items
 
Mailing List
Subscribe to our mailing list below:
Email:
 
 
Store Sitemap or Flow Chart of Popular Store Categories, Sections, and Sub-Groups in a Tree Format.
Store Site Map

This button will take you to the Store NAVIGATION HELP and TUTORIALS Page, and tell you about the hidden search shortcuts and how to purchase the items For Sale here.
Store Navigation / Help
This button will perform a custom Google search of my website. Send me an email

Back to: Brian's Military Jeeps of WWII

Back to: Squadron Patches of WWII

Back to: Great*Find Antiques

Back to: Estate Art Glass

Back to: Victorian Lightning Rods

B and B Book Sales. Our books for sale on Amazon.com

You may like to visit my other sites above
- they will open in a new window -

 
Store Switch Board
A Fast Loading, No Frills List of Everything WWII I have up on Auction.  My WWII Items
 For Sale by Auction
A Fast Loading, No Frills List of Antiques, Art Glass, etc  I have up on Auction.  My Antiques
 For Sale by Auction
My Shipping, Return, and Auction Policies  Shipping, Return &
 Auction Policies
Legal Notices, Credits, and Thanks: copyrights, Q and A regarding permission to copy content, photographs, and text, Thank you's, and groups that I belong to.  Legal Notices
Convert your to Currency to US$  Currency Converter
Translate my webpages into other languages.  Language Translator
Have some extra items you want to sell? Post them for free on my Free Classified Ads Bulletin Boards.  Sell Your Extras - 
 Free Classified Ads
My Want Lists:  Lists of item I want for my personal collections. Please have a look and see if you can help me out with any of them.  My Want Lists
Click Here to get on My Mailing Lists and Why you should.  Join My Mailing Lists,
 How and Why
   SIGNAL CORPS              6475-PHILA-44-01 

Powered by CubeCart
Copyright Devellion Limited 2006. All rights reserved.