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WWII Patch, AAF, WASP Women AirForce Service Pilots, Avenger Field Sweetwater, TX #3

WWII Patch, AAF, WASP Women AirForce Service Pilots, Avenger Field Sweetwater, TX #3

Product Information
WWII US Army Air Force Squadron Patch #3
USAAF
WASP Women Air Force Service Pilots, Avenger Field Sweetwater, TX
US AAF WASP Women AirForce Service Pilots, Avenger Field Sweetwater, TX
Walt Disney Design - Fifinella, a female gremlin
5 3/8 inches

Helped train future pilots for Fighter Fighting Bomb Bombing Bomber Bombardment squadrons.
WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots) were stationed at 120 air bases and flew 60 million miles in every type military aircraft in the Army Air Force inventory, from the fastest fighters to the heaviest bombers. They towed targets for air-to-air gunnery and air-to-ground anti-aircraft practice, ferried aircraft, were instrument instructors for male pilots, flew weather, night tracking, simulated strafing and radar navigation missions, transported personnel and cargo and flew drones. They flew every type mission that any Army Air Force pilot flew except combat  missions.

W.A.S.P. - Women Airforce Service Pilots
The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) and its predecessor groups the Women’s Flying Training Detachment (WFTD) and the Women's Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron  (WAFS) (from September 10, 1942) were pioneering organizations of civilian female pilots employed to fly military aircraft under the direction of the United States Army Air Forces during World War II. The WFTD and WAFS were combined on August 5, 1943, to create the paramilitary WASP organization. The female pilots of the WASP would end up numbering 1,074, each freeing a male pilot for combat service and duties. The WASP flew over 60 million miles in all, in every type of military aircraft. WASPs were granted veteran status in 1977, and given the Congressional Gold Medal in 2009.

Twenty-five thousand women applied to join the WASP, but only 1,830 were accepted and took the oath, and out of those only 1,074 women passed the training and joined.


Creation of the WASP
By the summer of 1941, the famous women pilots Jacqueline "Jackie" Cochran and test-pilot Nancy Harkness Love independently submitted proposals for the use of female pilots in non-combat missions to the US Army Air Forces (USAAF, the predecessor to the United States Air Force or USAF) after the outbreak of World War II in Europe.  The motivation was to free male pilots for combat roles by employing qualified female pilots on missions such as ferrying aircraft from factories to military bases, and towing drones and aerial targets. Leading into Pearl Harbor, General Henry H. "Hap" Arnold, commander of the USAAF, had turned down both Love's 1940 proposal and the proposal of the better connected and more famous Cochran despite unsubtle lobbying by Eleanor Roosevelt, but essentially promised command of any such effort to Cochran, should such a force be needed in the future.

While the U.S. was not yet fighting in the war, Cochran had gone to England to volunteer to fly for the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA). The ATA had been using female pilots since January 1940 and was starting to train new ones as well. The American women who flew in the ATA were the first American women to fly military aircraft. They flew the Royal Air Force's front-line aircraft—Spitfires, Typhoons, Hudsons, Mitchells, Blenheims, Oxfords, Walruses, and Sea Otters—in a non-combat role, but in combat-like conditions. Most of these women served the war in the ATA. In fact, only three members of the ATA returned to the U.S. to participate in the WASP program. The U.S. was building its air power and military presence in anticipation of direct involvement in the conflict and had belatedly begun to drastically expand its men in uniform. This period had led to a dramatic increase in activity for the U.S. Army Air Forces, and there were obvious gaps in "manpower" that could be filled by women. However, it was not until after the attack on Pearl Harbor brought U.S. armed forces into the war that it became evident there were not enough male pilots.

To those most involved within the USAAF, especially in the new Ferrying Division of the Air Transport Command (ATC), the numbers were painfully obvious. Ferrying Division commander Brig. Gen. William H. Tunner, in charge of acquiring civilan ferry pilots, decided to integrate a civilian force of female pilots into the AAF after speaking with a fellow ATC staff officer, Major Robert M. Love and his wife Nancy. Convinced of the feasibility of the program by Mrs. Love, who had a Commercial Pilot Licence, he asked her to draw up a proposal, unaware that Arnold had shelved a similar proposal by Tunner's superior, Maj. Gen. Robert Olds.

Cochran had committed to go to Great Britain in March 1942 for a trial program of female pilots with the ATA, and used her association with President and Mrs. Roosevelt to lobby Arnold to reject any plan that did not commission women and set up an independent organization commanded by women. Ironically, Tunner's proposal called for commissioning women in the WAACs, which was turned down after review by Arnold.

By mid-summer of 1942, Arnold was willing to consider the prior proposals seriously. Tunner and Love's plan was reviewed by ATC headquarters, and forwarded by now-commander Gen. Harold L. George to Arnold, who was fully aware of it and gave it his blessing after Mrs. Roosevelt suggested a similar idea in a newspaper column. The Women's Auxiliary Ferry Squadron (WAFS), headed by Mrs. Love, went into operation on September 10, 1942. Soon the Air Transport Command began using women to ferry planes from factory to air fields.

Cochran returned to the United States on September 10 as the new organization was being publicized, and immediately confronted Arnold for an explanation. Arnold claimed ignorance and blamed the ATC staff, in particular George's chief of staff, Col. (and former president of American Airlines) C. R. Smith. With the publicity involved, the WAFS program could not be reversed, and so on September 15 Cochran's training proposal was also adopted. Cochran and Love's squadrons were thereby established separately: as the 319th Women’s Flying Training Detachment (WFTD) at Municipal Airport (now Hobby Airport) in Houston, Texas, with Cochran as commanding officer, and the Women's Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron, 2nd Ferrying Group, at New Castle (Delaware) Army Air Base (now New Castle Airport).

Though rivals, the two programs and their respective leaders operated independently and without acknowledgment of each other until the summer of 1943, when Cochran pushed aggressively for a single entity to control the activity of all women pilots. Although Tunner in particular objected on the basis of differing qualification standards and the absolute necessity of ATC being able to control its own pilots, Cochran's pre-eminence with Arnold prevailed, and in July 1943 he ordered the programs merged, with Cochran as director. The WAFS and the WFTD combined to form the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP).


Initial WASP training
WASP training spanned 19 groups of women including The Originals, or WAFS lead by Nancy Love, and The Guinea Pigs—Jacqueline Cochran's first of 18 classes of women pilots. WASPs were required to complete the same primary, basic, and advanced training courses as male Army Air Corps pilots, and many went on to specialized flight training. There were two Chinese-American women in the WASP, Hazel Ying Lee and Maggie Gee (pilot). Ola Mildred Rexroat, an Oglala Sioux woman from Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, was the only Native American woman in the WASP; she survived the war and later joined the Air Force. All the other members of the WASP were white; no African-Americans were allowed to join the WASP.

The WAFS, each with an average of about 1,400 flying hours and a commercial pilot rating, received 30 days of orientation to learn Army paperwork and to fly by military regulations. Afterward, they were assigned to various ferrying commands.

The Guinea Pigs started training at Houston Municipal Airport on November 16, 1942, as part of the 319th Army Air Force Women's Flying Training Detachment (AAFWFTD). This was just after the WAFS had started their orientation in Wilmington, Delaware. Unlike the WAFS, the women that reported to Houston did not have uniforms and had to find their own lodging. The "Woofteddies" (WFTD) also had minimal medical care, no life insurance, no crash truck, no fire truck, a loaned ambulance from Ellington, insufficient administrative staff, and a hodgepodge of aircraft—23 types—for training. As late as January 1943, when the third class was about to start their training, the three classes were described by Byrd Granger in On Final Approach as, "a raggle-taggle crowd in a rainbow of rumpled clothing" as they gathered for morning and evening colors.


This lack of resources was combined with the foggy and wet Houston weather, which delayed the graduation of the first class from February to April. Conditions included the wet sticky clay soil everywhere, and a scarcity of rest rooms; the potential for morale problems was significant. To minimize this, the Fifinella Gazette was started. The first issue was published February 10, 1943. The female gremlin Fifinella, conceived by Roald Dahl and drawn by Walt Disney, was used as the official WASP mascot and appeared on their shoulder patches. The first Houston class started with 38 women with a minimum of 200 hours. Twenty-three graduated on April 24, 1943, at the only Houston WASP graduation at Ellington Army Air Field. The second Houston class, starting in December 1942 with a minimum of 100 hours, finished their training just in time to move to Sweetwater  and become the first graduating class from Avenger Field on May 28, 1943. The third class completed their advanced training at Avenger Field and graduated July 3, 1943. Half the fourth class, 76 women, started their primary training in Houston on February 15, 1943, and then transferred to Sweetwater.

On March 7, 1943, the Houston classes incurred their first fatality. Margaret Oldenburg of 43-W-4 and her instructor, Norris G. Morgan, crashed seven miles south of Houston and were killed on impact.

By the end of May 1943, the Houston 319th AAFWFTD was history. Later, in the summer of 1943, both the WAFS and WFTD were renamed WASP.

Duties of the WASP
The WASP women pilots each already had a pilot's license. They were trained to fly "the Army way" by the U.S. Army Air Forces at Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas. More than 25,000 women applied for WASP service, and fewer than 1,900 were accepted.  After completing four months of military flight training, 1,078 of them earned their wings and became the first women to fly American military aircraft. Except for the fact that the women were not training for combat, their course of instruction was essentially the same as that for aviation cadets. The WASPs thus received no gunnery training and very little formation flying and acrobatics, but went through the maneuvers necessary to be able to recover from any position. The percentage of trainees who were eliminated during training compared favorably with the elimination rates for male cadets in the Central Flying Training Command. After training, the WASPs were stationed at 120 air bases across the U.S. assuming numerous flight-related missions, relieving male pilots for combat duty.  They flew sixty million miles of operational flights from aircraft factories to ports of embarkation and military training bases, towing targets for live anti-aircraft artillery practice and simulated strafing missions, and transporting cargo. Almost every type of aircraft flown by the USAAF during World War II was also flown at some point by women in these roles. In addition, a few exceptionally qualified women were allowed to test rocket-propelled planes, to pilot jet-propelled planes, and to work with radar-controlled targets. Between September 1942 and December 1944, the WASP delivered 12,650 aircraft of 78 different types. Over fifty percent of the ferrying of combat aircraft within the United States during the war was carried out by WASP pilots.

Thirty-eight WASP fliers lost their lives while serving during the war — 11 in training and 27 on active duty, all in accidents. Because they were not considered to be in the military under the existing guidelines, a fallen WASP was sent home at family expense without traditional military honors or note of heroism. The army would not even allow the U.S. flag to be put on fallen WASP pilots' coffins.

Battle for militarization
The WASP were civil service employees and did not receive military benefits, unlike their male counterparts. On the other hand, they were not administratively tied to the Army Air Forces and could resign at any time after completion of their training, although few if any did.

On 30 September 1943 the first of the WASP militarization bills was introduced in the United States House of Representatives. Both Cochran and Arnold desired a separate corps headed by a woman colonel (similar to the WAC, WAVES, SPAR, and Marine heads). The War Department, however, consistently opposed such a move, since there was no separate corps for male pilots as distinguished from nonrated AAF officers. Instead, it preferred that women be commissioned in the WAC and thus added to some 2,000 "Air WAC" officers already assigned, for whom flying duty was then legally permissible.

On June 21, 1944, the bill in the House to give the WASP military status was narrowly defeated after civilian male pilots, reacting to closure of some civilian flight training schools and termination of two male pilot training commissioning programs, lobbied against the bill. The House Committee on the Civil Service (Ramspeck Committee) reported on June 5, 1944, that it considered the WASP was unnecessary, and unjustifiably expensive, and recommended that the recruiting and training of inexperienced women pilots be halted.

Cochran had been pushing for a resolution of the question, in effect delivering an ultimatum to either commission the women or disband the program. The AAF had developed an excess of pilots and pilot candidates, and as a result, Arnold (who had been a proponent of militarization) ordered that the WASP be disbanded by December 20, 1944. Arnold is quoted from a speech he delivered at Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas on December 7, 1944:

    The WASP have completed their mission. Their job has been successful. But as is usual in war, the cost has been heavy. Thirty-eight WASP have died while helping their country move toward the moment of final victory. The Air Forces will long remember their service and their final sacrifice.

At the conclusion of the WASP program there were 916 women pilots on duty with the AAF, with 620 assigned to the Training Command, 141 to the Air Transport Command, 133 to the numbered air forces in the Continental United States, 11 to the Weather Wing, 9 to the technical commands, and one to the Troop Carrier Command.

Legacy

All records of the WASP were classified and sealed for 35 years, so their contributions to the war effort were little known and inaccessible to historians. In 1975, under the leadership of Col. Bruce Arnold, son of General Hap Arnold, the WASPs fought the "Battle of Congress" in Washington, D.C., to belatedly obtain recognition as veterans of World War II. They organized as a group again and tried to gain public support for their official recognition. Finally, in 1977, the records were unsealed after an Air Force press release erroneously stated the Air Force was training the first women to fly military aircraft for the U.S.


This time, the WASPs lobbied Congress with the important support of Senator Barry Goldwater, who himself had been a World War II ferry pilot in the 27th Ferry Squadron. President Jimmy Carter signed legislation #95-202, Section 401, The G.I. Bill Improvement Act of 1977, granting the WASP corps full military status for their service. In 1984, each WASP was awarded the World War II Victory Medal. Those who served for more than one year were also awarded American Theater Ribbon/American Campaign Medal for their service during the war. Many of the medals were accepted by the recipients' sons and daughters on their behalf.

Because of the pioneering and the expertise they demonstrated in successfully flying military aircraft, the WASP pilots' record showed that women pilots, when given the same training as men pilots, were as capable as men in non-combat flying.

On July 1, 2009 President Barack Obama and the United States Congress awarded the WASP the Congressional Gold Medal. Three of the roughly 300 surviving WASPs were on hand to witness the event. During the ceremony President Obama said, "The Women Airforce Service Pilots courageously answered their country's call in a time of need while blazing a trail for the brave women who have given and continue to give so much in service to this nation since. Every American should be grateful for their service, and I am honored to sign this bill to finally give them some of the hard-earned recognition they deserve."  On March 10, 2010, 200 surviving WASPs came to the US Capitol to accept the Congressional Gold Medal from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Congressional leaders.  from wikipedia


WHERE WASP WERE STATIONED DURING WWII
 
ALAMOGORDO ARMY AIR BASE  -- ALAMOGORDO, NEW MEXICO
WASP FLEW B-17'S, C-47'S, C-50'S, C-53'S, UC-78'S, C-45'S, AT-11'S & L-5'S. WASP flew as pilots, copilots, and utility pilots. Missions included cargo deliveries, flight checks, and search missions.

ALOE ARMY AIR FIELD -- VICTORIA, TEXAS

WASP flew AT-6's. Orders included working as instrument instructors and towing targets.

ALTUS ARMY AIR FIELD  -- ALTUS, OKLAHOMA
WASP flew UC-78'S as engineering test pilots and utility pilots.

ASHVILLE WEATHER WING HQ -- ARMY AIRWAYS COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM HQ -- ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
WASP flew UC-78'S, AT-11'S, C-60'S, B-25'S ferrying non-flying personnel, transporting documents and cargo, helped establish routes for B-29'S and weather flights.

ATLANTA WEATHER WING  -- ATLANTA, GEORGIA


BAINBRIDGE ARMY AIR FIELD    -- BAINBRIDGE, GEORGIA

WASP flew BT-13's as test pilots.

BIGGS ARMY AIR FIELD  -- EL PASO, TEXAS
WASP flew B-26/s and B-34's towing targets at high altitude, B-26's and B-34's towing targets at low altitude, and A-24's and P-47's to simulate strafing (diving to buzz troops and gun positions). WASP also flew searchlight missions (without navigation or other lights to provide practice for searchlight crews in AT-7's, AT-11's, and C-45's),tracking missions in A-24's and P-47's to instruct anti-aircraft gunnery crews with moving targets, radar tracking to train radar operators, radio-controlled target flying (controlling PQ-8's and PQ-14's from UC-78's and C-45's), low altitude night missions (dropping flares on troops and gun emplacements), and laying smoke screens at low altitude.

BLACKLAND ARMY AIR FIELD  -- WACO, TEXAS

WASP flew AT-10's as engineering/test/maintenance pilots and utility pilots.

BLYTHEVILLE ARMY AIR FIELD  -- BLYTHVILLE, ARKANSAS

WASP flew as B-25 co-pilots, and AT-10 pilots. Assignments included engineering test pilots, instrument check pilots, ferrying, and flight checks for returning overseas pilots.

BRYAN ARMY AIR BASE  -- BRYAN TEXAS
WASP flew AT-6' and BT-13's as engineering test pilots.

BUCKINGHAM ARMY AIR FIELD  -- FORT MYERS, FLORIDA
WASP flew B-17's (co-pilot), AT-6's and BT-13's. Missions included flying with 8 gunners firing at targets towed over the Gulf of Mexico.

CAMP DAVIS ARMY AIR FIELD   -- CAMP DAVIS, NORTH CAROLINA
WASP flew A-24's and A-25's towing targets, flying radar deception missions, night target-towing missions, and tracking missions.

CASPER ARMY AIR FIELD  -- CASPER, WYOMING

WASP flew B-24's, C-45's, BT-13 as engineering test pilots.

CHICO ARMY AIR FIELD  -- CHICO, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew AT-7's, UC-78's, and BT-13 as engineering test pilots.

CHILDRESS ARMY AIR FIELD   -- CHILDRESS, TEXAS
WASP flew AT-11's on bombing range runs to train bombardiers and navigators.

CLOVIS ARMY AIR FIELD  -- CLOVIS, NEW MEXICO
WASP flew B-17's (copilot), UC-78's on twilight weather checks, and 1 WASP checked to fly the B-29.

COCHRAN ARMY AIRFIELD   -- MACON, GEORGIA
WASP flew BT-13's and AT-6's as engineering test pilots.

COFFEYVILLE ARMY AIR BASE  -- COFFEYVILLE, KANSAS

WASP flew BT-13's as engineering test pilots.

COLUMBUS ARMY AIR FIELD  -- COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI

WASP flew AT-10's in flight testing, ferrying, and utility /administrative flights

COURTLAND ARMY AIR FIELD  --- COURTLAND, ALABAMA
WASP flew BT-13's, UC-78's, and B24's.

CRAIG ARMY AIR FIELD  -- SELMA, ALABAMA
WASP flew AT-6's and primary trainers for "mothballing"

DALHART ARMY AIR FIELD  -- DALHART, TEXAS
The last hop-scotching of women pilots in WWII was on 12 Dec 44 when 2 WASP were transferred to Dalhart.

DEMING ARMY AIR FIELD -- DEMING, NEW MEXICO

Deming was a sub-base of Biggs .  WASP flew AT-6's, B-25's, B-26's, and P-47's.

DODGE CITY ARMY AIR BASE - DODGE CITY, KANSAS
WASP flew B-26's.as tow target pilots for air-to-air gunnery practice by "green" gunners using live ammunition.

DOUGLAS ARMY AIR FIELD -- DOUGLAS, ARIZONA
WASP flew BT-14's, AT-6's, UC-78's, AT-9's, AT-17's, and B-25's as utility/administrative and engineering pilots.

DYESRBURG ARMY AIRFIELD  -- DYERSBURG, TENNESSEE

WASP flew L-5's on tracking missions, and B-17's.

EAGLE PASS ARMY AIR BASE  -- EAGLE PASS, TEXAS
WASP flew AT-6's and PT-19 in ferrying and administrative flying.

EGLIN ARMY AIR BASE -- NICEVILLE, FLORIDA
WASP flew as engineering test pilots and fixed gunnery tow target pilots, flying AT-6 ferrying; PQ-8, radio control gunnery targets, and A-20, B-25, P-39, P-47, B-29, UL-61, and A-36.

ELLINGTON ARMY AIR FIELD  -- HOUSTON, TEXAS
WASP flew AT-10: utility/administrative (including flying hospital plane (Norseman), engineering/test; ferrying; copilots on navigation training flights.

ENID ARMY AIR BASE -- ENID, OKLAHOMA

WASP flew utility/administrative; engineering/testing and ferrying in T-13's and BT-15's 

FAIRFAX FIELD -- KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI
WASP flew ferrying missions in BT-15's and B-25's.

FORT SUMNER ARMY AIR FIELD -- FORT SUMNER, NEW MEXICO
WASP flew as utility pilots in C-47's and C-53's.

FOSTER ARMY AIR FIELD -- VICTORIA, TEXAS
WASP flew AT-6 liaison, administrative, instrument instruction, and ferrying.

FREDERICK ARMY AIR FIELD -- FREDERICK, OKLAHOMA
WASP flew AT-6, UC-78, and B-24 in administrative and engineering; and flight checked returning overseas pilots to prepare them for instructing cadets.

FREEMAN ARMY AIR FIELD  -- SEYMOUR, INDIANA
WASP flew engineering/maintenance flight testing in AT-10's.
 
GARDEN CITY ARMY AIR BASE  -- GARDEN CITY, KANSAS
WASP flew BT-13 and UC-78 as engineering, utility, administrative, and instrument safety pilots

GARDNER ARMY AIR BASE -- TAFT, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew BT-13 and PT-17 as engineering, administrative, and ferrying pilots.

GEORGE ARMY AIRBASE  -- LAWRENCEVILLE, ILLINOIS
WASP flew AT-10 as engineering and check pilots.

GOODFELLOW ARMY AIR FIELD -- SAN ANGELO, TEXAS
WASP flew AT-6 and BT-13 as instrument instructors and PT-19 in ferrying.

GOWEN ARMY AIR BASE -- BOISE, IDAHO
WASP flew B-24 transition with B-26's flying attack-curve, and B-17's in formation with B-26's flying through to break formations.

GRAND ISLAND ARMY AIR BASE  -- GRAND ISLAND, NEBRASKA
WASP flew B-17, C-47, C-45, UC-78, and L-5 as utility, engineering, administrative, tracking, and cargo transport pilots.

GREAT BEND ARMY AIR BASE -- GREAT BEND, KANSAS
WASP flew B-26 and B-17 radar navigation training, engineering, and administrative flights.

GREENVILLE ARMY AIRBASE  --
WASP flew BT-13, UC-78, and AT-10 as utility, administrative, and engineering pilots.

GREENWOOD ARMY AIR BASE  -- GREENWOOD, MISSISSIPPI
WASP flew BT-13 and BT-15 as engineering test pilots and ferrying for "mothballing".

GUNTER ARMY AIR FIELD -- GUNTER, ALABAMA
WASP flew BT-13, AT-6, AT-10, and UC-78 as utility/engineering and administrative pilots and as instrument instructors.

HALF MOON BAY FLIGHT STRIP -- MOSS BEACH, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew UC-78 "mother ship" radio controlling PQ-14: AT-11

HAMILTON ARMY AIR FIELD  --
WASP flew utility and administrative flights.

HARDING ARMY AIR FIELD -- BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA
WASP flew BT-13 and UC-78 as utility, administration, and instrument safety pilots.

HARLINGEN ARMY AIR FIELD -- Harlingen, Texas
WASP flew B-26 as tow target pilots for the flexible gunnery school.

HONDO ARMY AIRFIELD  -- HONDO, TEXAS
WASP flew C-45 in navigational flying to train cadet navigators.

INDEPENDENCE ARMY AIR FIELD  --
WASP flew BT-14 as utility/administrative pilots, engineering test flying, and ferrying.

JACKSON ARMY AIR FIELD --
WASP flew AT-6 as utility/administrative, engineering test, and instrument safety piloting.

23rd WEATHER REGION HQ  -- KANSAS CITY, KANSAS
WASP flew C-45 on administrative flights, flying inspectors on tour of seven states weather stations.

KELLY ARMY AIR BASE -- SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS
WASP flew flying inspectors to weather stations in a five state area in A-24 and AT-17

KEY ARMY AIR FIELD -- MERIDAN, MISSISSIPPI
Wasp were part of HQ for the 3rd Tactical Air Division, flying B-25s.

KINGMAN ARMY AIR BASE  -- KINGMAN, ARIZONA

WASP flew B-26's at this flexible gunnery school.

LA JUNTA ARMY AIR FIELD   -- LA JUNTA, COLORADO
WASP flew BT-13, AT-6, and B-25 as utility/administrative pilots.

LAREDO ARMY AIR BASE -- LAREDO, TEXAS
WASP flew B-26 as tow target pilots and B-26, P-40, and P-63 as engineering test pilots.

LAS VEGAS ARMY AIR FIELD  -- LAS VEGAS, NEVADA

WASP flew B-17, B-26, P-39, AT-10, and AT-6 as utility/administrative pilots, tow target, photographic "shooting" , range estimation, instrument instructors and safety piloting.

LEMOORE ARMY AIR BASE  --

WASP flew as BT-15 engineering/test pilots.

LIBERTY FIELD
WASP flew A-24 and A-25 as they received a 90-day instruction/practice in piloting radio-controlled aircraft.  Some flew B-34, C-45, PQ-8, and PQ-14 as they did radar tracking, high tow target for anti-aircraft practice, night searchlight tracking, and strafing.

LOCKBOURNE ARMY AIR BASE -- COLUMBUS, OHIO

WASP went through B-17 flying school at this base.

LONG BEACH ARMY AIR BASE -- LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA

WASP flew fighters as this base belonged to the 6th Fighter Group of the Air Transport Command.

LOVE FIELD  -- DALLAS, TEXAS
WASP flew an assortment of aircraft, including fighters.

LUBBOCK ARMY AIR BASE  -- LUBBOCK, TEXAS

WASP flew AT-10, UC-78, and AT-6 as engineering/test and administrative pilots.

LUKE FIELD  -- GOODYEAR, ARIZONA
WASP flew PT's, BT-13, AT-6, B-26, and B-24 as engineering/test, administrative, and ferrying pilots.

MAJORS ARMY AIR FIELD  -- GREENVILLE, TEXAS

WASP flew BT-13 as engineering and administrative pilots.

MALDEN ARMY AIR FIELD -- MALDEN, MISSOURI

WASP flew administrative flights.

MARANA ARMY AIR FIELD -- MARANA, ARIZONA
WASP flew BT-13 as administrative and engineering test pilots.

MARCH ARMY AIR BASE -- RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew PQ-8, PQ-14, radio controlled drone target; B-26, B-37 tow target pilots, A-25 ground artillery "target"; B-24 searchlight and tracking missions.

MARFA ARMY AIR BASE -- MARFA, TEXAS
WASP flew UC-78.

MARIANNA ARMY AIR BASE  -- MARIANNA, FLORIDA

WASP instructed in AT-6 for instrument training and flew as engineering test pilots.

MATHER ARMY AIR BASE -- SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA
WASP checked out in B-25's.

MAXWELL FIELD -- MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA
WASP flew B-24, C-45, UC-78, AT-11, and YC-76 as engineering test pilots and as utility and administrative pilots.

MERCED ARMY AIR FIELD  -- MERCED, CALIFORNIA

WASP flew BT-13, AT-6, and PT-22 as engineering/test pilots and administrative and instrument observation.

MINTER FIELD  -- BAKERSFIELD, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew BT-13, ATR-6, and UC-78 as engineerng/test, utility, and administrative pilots.

MITCHELL FIELD   --LYNBROOK, LONG ISLAND NEW YORK
WASP flew C-45 in transporting non-flying Weather Wing personnel, flew weather checking missions and administrative flights.

MOODY ARMY AIR BASE  -- VALDOSTA, GEORGIA
WASP flew BT-13, B-25, AT-10, and PT-17 as instrument observers, utility, administrative, ferrying, and testing pilots.

MOORE ARMY AIR BASE -- MISSION, TEXAS
WASP flew AT-6, UC-78, ad C-45 as administrative, tow target, and ferrying pilots.

MUROC LAKE  -- MUROC LAKE, CALIFORNIA
This base was used as a TDY for WASP from Camp Davis to demonstrate radio-controlling PQ-8 carrying a bomb.

NAPIER ARMY AIR BASE -- DOTHAN, ALABAMA
WASP flew AT-6, PT-17 as engineering test pilots, administrative, instrument instructing, and ferrying.

NEW CASTLE ARMY AIR BASE  -- WILMINGTON, DELAWARE
WASP flew ferrying missions in Pts, Ats, pursuits, C-47, etc.

NEWPORT ARMY AIR FIELD  -- NEWPORT, ARKANSAS
WASP ferried BT-13 when the base was being deactivated.

OTIS ARMY AIR BASE  -- FALMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS
WASP flew PQ-8, PQ-14, and C-45 for radio controlled target drones.

PALM SPRINGS ARMY AIR BASE  -- PALM SPRINGS, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew as ferrying pilots in BT-13. C-47, PT-22, B-25, AT-6, P-39, P-51, P-47, P-63, P-38, A-20, B-26, and P-40.

PATTERSON FIELD -- FAIRFIELD, OHIO
WASP flew for the 2nd Weather Region HQ.

PECOS ARMY AIR BASE -- PECOS, TEXAS

WASP flew AT-6, UC-78, and AT-17 in engineering test, administrative, and transporting freight.

PERRIN ARMY AIR BASE  -- SHERMAN, TEXAS
WASP flew BT-13, AT-6, and UC-78 as engineering/test pilots, instrument instructors and administrative pilots.

PETERSON ARMY AIR BASE  -- COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO
WASP flew for the 72nd Fighter Wing (Fighter Interceptor School and as tow target pilots in the AT-23 and TB-26.

POCATELLO ARMY AIR BASE  -- POCATELLO, IDAHO
WASP flew BT-13 as instrument safety pilot, AT-10 and BC-1 as administrative pilot, and B-26 as copilot.

PRATT ARMY AIR BASE -- PRATT, KANSAS
WASP flew L-2 and L-5 tracking and search missions, UC-78 in administrative flights, B-26 in tow target missions and administrative cross country flights.

PUEBLO ARMY AIRBASE  -- PUEBLO, COLORADO
WASP flew B-26 .B-24.B-25, UC-78, and L-5 as administrative pilots.

RANDOLPH ARMY AIR BASE -- SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

WASP flew AT-6, AT-7, and PT-19 as administrative pilots and check pilots for newly assigned personnel.

ROMULUS ARMY AIR BASE  -- ROMULUS, MICHIGAN
WASP flew PT's, AT's, C-47, B-24 and pursuits in ferrying and administrative flights.

ROSECRANS ARMY AIR FIELD  -- ST. JOSEPH, MISSOURI
WASP flew AT-11, C-47, and B-25 as students in this instrument school for ATC pilots.

SALINAS ARMY AIR BASE  -- SALINAS, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew B-25, PQ-14, BT-13, AT-11, and AT-10 in radio controlled target and administrative flights.

SAN MARCOS ARMY AIR BASE -- SAN MARCOS, TEXAS
Wasp flew AT-7, AT-11 as staff pilots and co-pilots on flights for navigator training.

SANTA ANA AIR BASE -- (ORANGE COUNTY AIRPORT) SANTA ANA, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew AT-6.

SANTA MONICA ARMY AIR BASE  -- SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA

WASP flew B-18, B-34, and A-24 .

SCOTT ARMY AIRBASE  -- GARY, INDIANA
WASP flew AT-6, UC-78, and AT-18 in ferrying, flying navigation cadets, and administrative.

SEATTLE AIRPORT -- SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
WASP flew with the 24th Weather Region HQ.

SELMAN ARMY AIR FIELD -- MONROE, LOUISIANA
WASP flew AT-10 in engineering test and night navigational training missions.

SHAW ARMY AIR BASE -- SUMPTER, SOUTH CAROLINA

WASP flew BT-13 as engineering test pilots, administrative, ferrying, and instrument instructing.

SIOUX FALLS ARMY AIR BASE -- SIOUX FALLS, SOUTH DAKOTA

WASP flew AT-11.

SMOKY HILL ARMY AIR BASE  -- SALINA, KANSAS
WASP flew B-29, C47, and C-53 at this air freight transport base.

SOUTH PLAINS ARMY AIR BASE  -- LUBBOCK, TEXAS
WASP flew B-25 and C-60 as trained pilots to tow CG-4A gliders at low altitude, mostly at night.

SPENCE ARMY AIR BASE -- MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
WASP flew BT-13 and AT-6 as engineering/test, administrative, and ferrying pilots, and as instrument observers.

STOCKTON ARMY AIR BASE  -- STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew AT-11, UC-78, and AT-6 as engineering/test and administrative pilots.

STROTHER FIELD  -- WINFIELD, KANSAS

WASP flew C47, C-53, UC-78 on administrative flights and ferried cadets and pilots to other fields for training.

STUTTGART ARMY AIR BASE  -- STUTTGART, ARKANSAS
WASP flew AT-10, AT-6, UC-78, and UC-64 as engineering/test, ferrying, and administrative/courier pilots.

TURNER ARMY AIR BASE -- ALBANY, GEORGIA
WASP flew AT-10 and B-25 as engineering/test and administrative pilots.

TYNDALL ARMY AIR BASE -- PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA

WASP flew B-26 as tow target pilots for air-to-air live gunnery practice and BT-13 on weather observation flights.

VICTORVILLE ARMY AIR BASE -- VICTORVILLE, CALIFORNIA
WASP flew B-25, AT-7, AT-11, and BT-13 on training flights for bombardier school cadets and on engineering/test and calibration missions.

WACO ARMY AIR FIELD -- WACO, TEXAS

WASP flew BT-13 and AT-6 as engineering/test, administrative, ferrying, and instrument instruction pilots.

WALKER ARMY AIR BASE  -- VICTORIA, KANSAS
WASP flew L-5, C-47, and B-17 as engineering/test, administrative, and ferrying pilots.

WALNUT RIDGE ARMY AIR FIELD  -- WALNUT RIDGE, ARKANSAS

WASP flew trainers.

WENDOVER ARMY AIR BASE  -- WENDOVER, UTAH

WASP flew B-29, B-17, C-46, and C-54 in cargo/personnel transport and ferrying for atomic bomb project.

WILLIAMS ARMY AIR BASE  -- CHANDLER, ARIZONA

WASP flew BT-13 and AT-6 as engineering, administrative, and ferrying pilots.

WRIGHT FIELD   -- DAYTON, OHIO

WASP flew AT-6, L-5, BT-13, UC-78, B-17, B-25, C-47, and A-25.

YUMA ARMY AIR FIELD  -- YUMA, ARIZONA

WASP flew B-26, AT-11, BT-13 as tow target and administrative pilots.

Price: $150.00


Product Code: PatchAAF.0000.WASP.WomenAirForceServicePilots.AvengerField.S
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