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Location: /Squadron Patches/Army Air Force Squadrons/AAF units #'d 1-299

WWII Patch, AAF, 1st Army Air Forces Field Training Detachment, Lockheed Field, Burbank, CA - Mickey Mouse #1

WWII Patch, AAF, 1st Army Air Forces Field Training Detachment, Lockheed Field, Burbank, CA - Mickey Mouse #1

Product Information
WWII US Army Air Force Squadron Patch
US AAF  USAAF  1st Army Air Forces Field Training Detachment, Lockheed Field, Burbank, CA
US AAF  USAAF  1st AAFFTD = Army Air Force Flying Training Detachment, Lockheed Field, Burbank, CA
Fighter Training Squadron based at Lockheed Field, Burbank, CA.
Walt Disney Design - As pilot of a plane in flight, Mickey Mouse is aiming a slingshot.
5 3/8 inches
 

1943: Lockheed's Skunk Works founded in Burbank, California.

Establishment of Lockheed Field / Bob Hope Airport
Bob Hope Airport is now a public airport located 3 miles (5 km) northwest of the central business district of Burbank, a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. It was formerly known as Angeles Mesa Drive Airport (1928–1930), United Airport (1930–1934), Union Air Terminal (1934–1940), Lockheed Air Terminal (1940–1967), Hollywood-Burbank Airport (1967–1978), Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport (1978–2003) and most recently Bob Hope Airport (2003–present).

History of Lockheed Field
Boeing Aircraft and Transport (BA&T) was a holding company created in 1928 that included Boeing Aircraft and United Air Lines, itself a holding company for a collection of small airlines that continued to operate under their own names. One of these airlines was Pacific Air Transport (PAT), which Boeing had acquired because of PAT's west coast mail contract in January 1928. BA&T then sought a suitable site for a new airport for PAT, and found one in Burbank. BA&T had the benefit of surveys that the Aeronautics Department of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce had conducted starting in 1926 to identify potential airport sites.

It took BA&T a year and the cooperation of the city of Burbank to assemble the desired site from different parcels. The 234-acre (0.95 km2) site was rife with vines and trees, which had to be removed, and the ground had to be filled and leveled, but these negative features were offset by good drainage, a firm landing surface, steady winds, and good access to ground transport. Construction was completed in just seven months. In an age when few aircraft had brakes and many had a tail skid instead of a wheel, runways were not usually paved; those at Burbank consisted of a 5-inch-thick (130 mm) mixture of oil and sand. Initially there were no taxi strips, but the designers left room for them. Two of the runways were over 3,600 feet (1,100 m) long; a third was 2,900 feet (880 m); all were 300 feet (91 m) wide. These were generous dimensions by the standards of the day, and the site had ample room for later expansion.

Appropriately named United Airport, the new facility was dedicated amid much festivity (including an air show) on Memorial Day Weekend (May 30 - June 1), 1930. Aerial view looking SE Burbank's United Airport and its handsome Spanish revival terminal quickly proved to be a state-of-the-art facility and a showy new competitor to the nearby Grand Central Airport in neighboring Glendale, which was at that time considered to be Los Angeles' main air terminal. The new Burbank facility was actually the largest commercial airport in the Los Angeles region until it was eclipsed in 1946 by the Los Angeles Airport in Westchester when that facility (formerly Mines Field, then Los Angeles Municipal Airport) commenced scheduled commercial operations.

The Burbank facility remained named United Airport until 1934, when it was renamed Union Air Terminal. The name change came the same year that Federal anti-trust actions caused United Aircraft And Transport Corp. to dissolve, which took effect September 26, 1934. The Union Air Terminal moniker stuck for six years, until Lockheed bought the airport in 1940.

Lockheed immediately renamed the property the Lockheed Air Terminal. Commercial air traffic continued even while Lockheed's extensive aircraft-manufacturing facilities at the airport supplied the war effort and developed numerous military and commercial aircraft in the ensuing war years and into the mid-1960s.

Lockheed
In 1934, Robert E. Gross was named chairman of the Lockheed Corporation, which was headquartered at the airport in Burbank, California. His brother Courtlandt S. Gross was a co-founder and executive, succeeding Robert as Chairman following his death in 1961. The first successful construction that was built in any number (141 aircraft) was the Vega, best known for its use to several first- and record setting flights by, among others, Amelia Earhart, Wiley Post and George Hubert Wilkins.

In the 1930s, Lockheed spent $139,400 ($2.29 million) to develop the Model 10 Electra, a small twin-engine transport. The company sold forty in the first year of production. Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, flew this plane on their failed attempt to circumnavigate the world in 1937. Follow-on designs, the Lockheed Model 12 Electra Junior and the Lockheed Model 14 Super Electra expanded their market.

Pre-War production
The Lockheed Model 14 formed the basis for the Hudson bomber, which was supplied to both the British Royal Air Force and the United States military before and during World War II. Its primary role was submarine hunting. The Model 14 Super Electra were sold abroad, and more than 100 were license-built in Japan for use by the Imperial Japanese Army. Lockheed was delivering airplanes to Japan until May 1939.

Production during World War II
At the beginning of World War II, Lockheed – under the guidance of Clarence (Kelly) Johnson, who is considered one of the best known American aircraft designers – answered a specification for an interceptor by submitting the P-38 Lightning fighter plane, a somewhat unorthodox twin-engine, twin-boom design. The P-38 was the only American fighter aircraft in production throughout American involvement in the war, from Pearl Harbor to Victory over Japan Day. It filled ground attack, air-to-air, and even strategic bombing roles in all theaters of the war in which the United States operated. The P-38 was responsible for shooting down more Japanese aircraft than any other U.S. Army Air Forces type during the war; and is particularly famous for being the airplane that shot down Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto's airplane.

The Lockheed Vega factory was located next to Burbank's Union Airport which it had purchased in 1940. During the war, the entire area was camouflaged to fool enemy aerial reconnaissance. The factory was hidden beneath a huge burlap tarp painted to depict a peaceful semi-rural neighborhood, replete with rubber automobiles. Hundreds of fake trees, shrubs, buildings and even fire hydrants were positioned to give a three dimensional appearance. The trees and shrubs were created from chicken wire treated with an adhesive and covered with feathers to provide a leafy texture.

All told, Lockheed and its subsidiary Vega produced 19,278 aircraft during World War II, representing six percent of those produced in the war. This included 2,600 Venturas, 2,750 B-17 Flying Fortresses (built under license from Boeing), 2,900 Hudsons, and 9,000 Lightnings.

Postwar production
During World War II, Lockheed, in cooperation with Trans-World Airlines (TWA), had developed the L-049 Constellation, a radical new airliner capable of flying 43 passengers between New York and London at a speed of 300 mph (480 km/h) in 13 hours. Once the Constellation (affectionately called "Connie") went into the production, the military received the first production models. After the war, the airlines received their original orders of Constellations. This gave Lockheed more than a year's head-start over other aircraft manufacturers in what was easily foreseen as the post-war modernisation of civilian air travel. The Constellations' performance set new standards which transformed the civilian transportation market. Its signature tri-tail was the result of many initial customers not having hangars tall enough for a conventional tail.

Skunk Works
In 1943, Lockheed began, in secrecy, development of a new jet fighter at its Burbank facility. This fighter, the Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star, became the first American jet fighter to score a kill. It also recorded the first jet-to-jet aerial kill, downing a MiG-15 in Korea, although by this time the F-80 (as it came to be known in June 1948) was already considered obsolete.

Starting with the P-80, Lockheed's secret development work was conducted by its Advanced Development Division, more commonly known as the Skunk Works. The name was taken from Al Capp's comic strip Li'l Abner. This organization has become famous and has spawned many successful Lockheed designs, including the U-2 (late 1950s), SR-71 Blackbird (1962) and F-117 Nighthawk stealth fighter (1978s). The Skunk Works often created high quality designs in a short time and sometimes with limited resources. from wikipeia

Westover Air Reserve Base
Westover Air Reserve Base was named for Major General Oscar Westover, commanding officer of the Army Air Corps in the 1930s, who was killed in the crash of his high-speed Northrop A-17AS, 36-349, c/n 289, in a crosswind short of the runway at Lockheed Aircraft's air field in Burbank, California, now known as Bob Hope Airport, on 21 September 1938.

Price: $200.00 $150.00


Product Code: PatchAAF.0001.1AAFFTD.LockheedField.BurbankCA.v1
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